Don’t be afraid to cut out what’s not working.

by inspiredrd on February 6, 2013

I’ve been in a sewing mood lately.  With me, craftiness is an all-or-nothing endeavor.  Sew all day for a week or sew not at all.  I’ve been having fun making handmade birthday presents and baby gifts.

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And as much as I’ve struggled in the past with sewing anything other than a straight line, I even whipped up some skirts and a dress for Leila last week. She helped me measure fabric, put away pins, guide the material towards the needle, and model her new creations.

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At one point, a skirt I had finished was entirely too long for her.  Even though I had already hemmed the fabric, I decided to cut off three inches and hem it again.  It was then that a thought came to my mind, “Don’t be afraid to cut out what’s not working.”

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See, I had done a good job hemming the skirt the first time.  Everything was finished.  It was good enough.  But I didn’t want to settle for good enough.  I wanted that skirt to be great.  Cutting out the excess fabric and re-hemming it took a “meh” project to something I can be proud of.  And I realized, there are so many things in life that are good…but some of those good things are getting in the way of great.  Sometimes too much of a good thing really isn’t so good at all.

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Is there any good in your life that might be getting in the way of great? 

 

(Side note: the skirt Leila is wearing with the pink shirt is entirely too big, does anyone know of a little girl who could wear it?  Leave me a comment!)

 

Links to the tutorials I used to sew the dress and skirt:
{Pillowcase Dress Tutorial from LBG Studio}
{7 Days a Week Skirt from Sewing in No Mans Land}

  • Erin Rhineheimer

    Kinley could totally sport that skirt! Love the print :)

  • jen

    Great blog!!
    Would the skirt that’s too big fit Lily?

  • Robin

    Could you hang onto it until it fits her?

  • http://www.dineanddish.net Kristen

    Your talents never cease to amaze me. I’m so impressed with your sewing (and your metaphor for life)

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